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Introducing Clash de Cartier, the Unorthodox Jewellery Exploring Duality

By Bianca Husodo

 
Cartier
 

A time-hallowed jewellery vanguard with historical roots entrenched deep beyond the one-century milestone tends to stick to the one thing it does best: crafting sublime classics. Cartier does that, but then pushes it a whole length further beyond the prescribed traditional tenets.

Today, in Paris, the French jeweller unveils its most subversive line yet: the Clash de Cartier. Calling it their “two-sided jewel” that does “a mix and match of aristocratic codes”, the collection explores the extreme duality of a jewellery. It revisits the house’s archival geometry designs and its penchant for studs, beads and clous carrés, or square nails, of which dates back to the ’30s, and reinterprets it disruptively; a form of rebellious design sedition, if you will, against the expectations of a high-jewellery archetype.

CartierFrom left: Clash de Cartier’s coral bead-festooned yellow gold ring, and the 4N pink gold studded bracelet.
From left: Clash de Cartier’s coral bead-festooned yellow gold ring, and the 4N pink gold studded bracelet.
CartierThe fresh face of Clash de Cartier, English actress Kaya Scodelario.
The fresh face of Clash de Cartier, English actress Kaya Scodelario.

The inaugural Clash de Cartier is a 14-piece range featuring rings, bracelets, necklaces and earrings in differing sizes. These pieces are constructed in a calibrated cluster of red beads or 4N pink gold pyramid square-nail studs, assembled in a row, with two more rows of smaller-sized studs, each lining one of its sides. The visual collision is venerating, but so is its tactility.

Despite projecting a sharp facade, the geometric pieces are contrastingly soft to the touch. It’s also deceivingly rigid-looking. The pieces are, in fact, designed with a mechanism for freedom of movement: through tiny almost-invisible magnets, their interconnected studs are adjustable. Toeing the line between masculinity and femininity, the Clash de Cartier is meant to be gender-neutral. As the house’s accompanying statement suggests, “Male. Female. No judgment.” This is the new classic.