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Editor’s Letter: Read T Singapore’s June Issue Online

By Renée Batchelor

On the cover of T Singapore’s “Sustainability” June 2020 issue is the Korean actor, Park Seo Jun, who most recently stars as the leading man in Netflix’s “Itaewon Class”.
 
Hong Jang Hyun
On the cover of T Singapore’s “Sustainability” June 2020 issue is the Korean actor, Park Seo Jun, who most recently stars as the leading man in Netflix’s “Itaewon Class”.

This month our June sustainability issue features cover subject, South Korean actor Park Seo Jun. TSingapore.com readers will be able to read the full issue on your desktops and tablets. To access it, click on the magazine tab on our website for an experience similar to reading a physical copy of T Singapore.

On the topic of sustainability, it seems fitting to examine it on a deeper level, especially in light of the current situation, with the Covid-19 pandemic, and questions on the future of travel and fashion at stake. Ultimately, the stories we’ve written shine a light on the game-changers who are bringing a message of hope in this time of crisis. While many things may seem out of our hands, it is heartening to note that so many individuals and companies are working hard to innovate and change the way we operate in order to ensure a more sustainable future. 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

With his career now on a comfortable upswing, it’s surprising that acting was but an accidental revelation for Park Seo Jun (@bn_sj2013). The thought of acting as a career had never existed until he was given a chance to perform on stage in high school. “The whole experience was very new and culture-shocking,” he shares. “Since (venturing into acting), I haven’t thought about anything else ever since.” . Stay tuned to @tsingapore for a digital copy of the June issue, or reach us at info@atlaspress.com.sg to get your hands on a copy of the print magazine. . Director: @hongjanghyun Editor-in-Chief: @jumiuswong Stylist: @imhrim Hair: @eomjungmi Make up: @lulu_dallae.j Set design: @daraksy Coordinator: @parkheeyoung__ Producer: @babylee82 Subject: @bn_sj2013 Outfit: Ralph Lauren Purple Label @ralphlauren . #tsingapore #tsingaporejune2020 #parkseojun #박서준 #itaewonclass #이태원클라쓰 #ralphlauren #ralphlaurenpurplelabel

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Read: How Park Seo Jun Is Breaking the Mould

Our cover subject, Korean actor Park Seo Jun is not just an accomplished actor and the lead of the wildly popular television series “Itaewon Class”, he is also known for forging close connections with his fans through social media. Read his thoughts on the South Korean entertainment scene and why he wants to bring joy to his fans, by offering them a more candid view into his life. As an actor, Park is constantly pushing the limits of human perception when it comes to his craft, and shares more of his inner life in our exclusive interview and beautiful fashion spread.  

Courtesy of Charles & KeithCecilie Bahnsen designs with details in mind. “It’s always important for me that when I design a dress it has longevity and every detail is perfect. This is also the same with shoes: the finish, attaching the sole and the buckles, which is very different to designing a dress.”
Cecilie Bahnsen designs with details in mind. “It’s always important for me that when I design a dress it has longevity and every detail is perfect. This is also the same with shoes: the finish, attaching the sole and the buckles, which is very different to designing a dress.”

Read: Cecilie Bahnsen’s Shoe Collaboration With Charles & Keith

Elsewhere in the issue, we tackle the idea of sustainability from all angles. For local shoe and accessories brand Charles & Keith, its collaboration with Danish designer Cecilie Bahnsen mines recycled and upcycled fabric and uses past season fabric stock in innovative ways — to create unique dustbags for the shoes. Translating the poetry of Bahnsen’s feminine, whimsical frocks into shoes, and then making them objects to be treasured for their craftsmanship and beauty, is one way to give fashion accessories a longer lifespan.

Courtesy of B.P. de Silva Jewellershas been supporting various courses since the time of its establishment. In 2018, the company pledged to donate 2 per cent of its sales to non-profits that share the same values.
has been supporting various courses since the time of its establishment. In 2018, the company pledged to donate 2 per cent of its sales to non-profits that share the same values.

Read: The Meaning of Sustainable Jewellery

In the jewellery world, sustainability is not just a buzzword, but one that raises deeper question on the ethical mining of raw materials and their traceability, and how this will become the gold standard in the industry in time to come. Separately, rather than focus on what any one individual brand is doing, we look at the impact of the travel disruption on the fashion industry as a whole, and how this will inevitably change the way we view and consume fashion in the future. 

Charles DeluvioEntering an era of unprecedented environmental crises, Singaporeans can still do better in terms of food waste management.
Entering an era of unprecedented environmental crises, Singaporeans can still do better in terms of food waste management.

Read: Where Should the Food Go?

Food waste is a huge problem in Singapore, with only 18 per cent of total food waste being recycled in 2019 according to the National Environment Agency. Writer Terence Poh tackles the subject of where food should go, with an in-depth look at three Singapore companies: UglyFood, treatsure and Insectta. With new initiatives that either redistribute food resources and manage waste, or essentially changes the way we view “ugly food” and even waste-consuming insects, it is clear that a big mindset shift is needed for a significant social and environmental impact down the road. 

Courtesy of CartierWith a new food production system, Adriana Luna gives a new life to indigenous agriculture landscape.
With a new food production system, Adriana Luna gives a new life to indigenous agriculture landscape.

Read: Mothers of Action

Finally, writer Lynette Kee takes look at three women, all mothers, who run start-ups in male-dominated fields. These women are inspired to challenge and transform the way that energy, agricultural and textile industries operate in order to build a better planet for future generations. It’s no coincidence that the planet is sometimes personified as a mother, and a diverse and empathetic contribution on the climate change issue is sorely needed today. We hope that our stories this month will challenge how you view sustainability, and inspire you to take a stand when it comes to your own lifestyle and consumption choices.

Read T’s entire “Sustainability” June 2020 issue here