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Editor’s Letter: Read T’s “Art, Design & Technology” Issue Online

By Renée Batchelor

On the cover of T Singapore’s “Art, Design & Technology” July 2020 issue is Ni Ni, the Chinese actress who has been actively using her voice and platform to speak up for causes she believes in.
 
Fan Xin
On the cover of T Singapore’s “Art, Design & Technology” July 2020 issue is Ni Ni, the Chinese actress who has been actively using her voice and platform to speak up for causes she believes in.

In our July “Art, Design and Technology” issue we celebrate the brands, designers and artists who are changing the conversation by looking ahead.

 

 

Read: To Ni Ni, the World Is a Stage

Our cover subject, Chinese actress NiNi, represents a new breed of celebrity, the ones who are looking beyond themselves to examine how they can meaningfully contribute both to the film industry and to society at large. The fashion spread with NiNi, our first cover this year shot amidst the beauty of nature, is also a welcome respite in the current landscape.

Doug DuBoisFrank Stella in his studio in upstate New York. From September 2020, the artist will have a show at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Connecticut, where he first showed 50 years ago.
Frank Stella in his studio in upstate New York. From September 2020, the artist will have a show at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Connecticut, where he first showed 50 years ago.

Read: The Artist Eternal

In art, the American painter and sculptor Frank Stella is still going strong with a planned exhibition later this year, based on the stars that have bookmarked his career. Our interview takes a closer look at his career evolution, his place in the annals of modern art, and how the spirit of creation can still remain strong in an older artist.

Wayne LawrenceIn Los Angeles, from left: Ulysses Jenkins Charles Dickson, Barbara McCullough, Senga Nengudi and the Brockman Gallery co-founder Dale Brockman Davis.
In Los Angeles, from left: Ulysses Jenkins Charles Dickson, Barbara McCullough, Senga Nengudi and the Brockman Gallery co-founder Dale Brockman Davis.

Read: The Artists

In the wake of the renewed Black Lives Matter movement, we also look at the history of a group of black artists in America who, long ignored by the art world, found representation in black-run galleries in the ‘60s and ‘70s and went on to become some of the most influential artists of our time, despite the discrimination and barriers faced.

Courtesy of SPRMRKTLeow Wei Li’s solo exhibition, “Homemade,” shows at SPRMRKT at Dempsey Hill until 12 July 2020.
Leow Wei Li’s solo exhibition, “Homemade,” shows at SPRMRKT at Dempsey Hill until 12 July 2020.

Read: The Artist of Everyday Things

Art in a post-pandemic world has also taken on interesting, new forms. Singaporean artist Leow Wei Li is using household materials for her latest body of work and cementing them onto a wooden canvas for a show called Homemade at SPRMRKT, that explores “the labour of love and methods of care that go into shaping the daily lives of everyday Singaporeans.”

Adam Amengual for The New York TimesBrighid Pulskamp at her sewing machine, where she creates her Navajo-inspired P.P.E. masks to distribute on the reservation. Some will be in the Autry Museum collection.
Brighid Pulskamp at her sewing machine, where she creates her Navajo-inspired P.P.E. masks to distribute on the reservation. Some will be in the Autry Museum collection.

Read: How Will We Remember the Pandemic?

The art of our children and even the masks that we use, are all part of the collective narrative of our post-Pandemic landscape. Read how museums across America are already beginning to curate and collect these objects and art to remember this challenging, but vital, part of our history. It also gives us pause to reflect on how this period has changed us as humans.

Wunderkammer Studio Chanel J12 Paradoxe watch in black ceramic and white gold with diamonds.
Chanel J12 Paradoxe watch in black ceramic and white gold with diamonds.

Read: Ones to Watch

When it comes to innovative design, it’s all about pushing boundaries and reimagining what we thought was possible. In our annual watch report, read about the 10 outstanding timepieces that have proven to be not just horological wonders but marvels of design and engineering. In a nod to the uses of technology today, as many of the pieces were not available for shoot due to the lockdown period and travel restrictions, some of these pieces were showcased in digital renderings.

Courtesy of AlgordanzaMost of Algordanza’s diamonds are eventually crafted into jewellery, worn by clients who want to be able to carry the presence of their loved ones with them at all times.
Most of Algordanza’s diamonds are eventually crafted into jewellery, worn by clients who want to be able to carry the presence of their loved ones with them at all times.

Read: Life After Death

Elsewhere in the issue, find out how one Swiss jewellery company is turning the remains of loved ones into gemstones that will last beyond a lifetime — a novel (and beautiful) way of addressing the eternity of death, while bringing a new meaning to the phrase “Diamonds are Forever.”

Getty Images, ShutterstockFrom left: The Dior New Look from 1947; hemlines and cloches from the flapper era.
From left: The Dior New Look from 1947; hemlines and cloches from the flapper era.

Read: This Is Not the End of Fashion

Finally The New York Times’ Vanessa Friedman addresses the topic of how the fashion industry might possibly evolve after the global disruption of its supply and demand chain. Her piece not only looks at the implications and history of the fashion industry, and the “shame” that some may feel at the ability to still buy fashion in a crisis, but quotes some major players in the industry on their thoughts. We hope you find this month’s reads interesting and engaging, and that they offer you challenging new ideas and perspectives.

Read T’s entire “Art, Design & Technology” July 2020 issue