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A Film Anthology Filled with The Peculiar and The Heartening

By Joe Tan

Silvia Calderoni in Gucci’s Ouverture Of Something That Never Ended film series’s “At Home” episode.
 
Paige Powell
Silvia Calderoni in Gucci’s Ouverture Of Something That Never Ended film series’s “At Home” episode.

The power of film, some argue, is the most evocative creative medium when stirring the emotions of a viewing audience, with its natural ability to tap on both our sense of sight and hearing for a stimulated response. In a TED Talk, Jonathan Chu — director of the commercially and critically acclaimed film “Crazy Rich Asians”, mentioned the importance of representation in film and the heartening effects it holds over us, saying “My first generation [immigrant] family cried because they saw our family as a normal family [in America] that fit in and belonged on the screen in front of them, just like the movies they worshipped and the TV shows that they named [my sister and I] after.” And when it comes to inclusivity, few will likely contest that Gucci ranks above most luxury labels when it comes to representation — spanning race, age, gender identity, and even the colours of one’s hair, as seen on its runways. Now, the luxury label has also launched a dedicated film festival coined “GucciFest” prior to the launch of its latest collection, extending their efforts further at promoting inclusivity. 

Paige Powell
 

Named collectively as the “Ouverture of Something that Never Ended”, the first of seven episodes directed by Gus Van Sant, follows a lone female protagonist  “At Home” going about her morning routine. Which perplexingly includes exercising in a transparent tulle jumpsuit while watching writer-philosopher Paul B. Preciado address directly to her from a television set on the “revolution of love” and “our changing desires”. A band begins to perform in a room at one point, and an unexpected visitor pops up towards the end to leave kisses on the protagonist after each round on a bicycle circling the apartment. 

In Gucci fashion, the film is visually depicted in a kaleidoscope of rich colours, as witnessed from the apartment’s interiors (reminiscent of its boutiques’ decor) and the wardrobe of the film cast, which captures the air of the label’s brand of strangeness. And in the course of its short 10-minute runtime, this along with the mish-mash of bizarre events adds confusion to what we know is likely the episode’s most important takeaway — that it's not about the storyline narrative, nor the clothes (as it were) — but that the film allows its eccentric cast of characters to simply belong as they should in their personal spaces.

In this first of seven episodes, made in collaboration between award-winning director Gus Van Sant and Gucci creative director Alessandro Michele, we follow main character Silvia through her eccentric morning routine at home in Rome.

 

In a press statement, the film series is mentioned to go on to raise more questions, such as, “Which new horizons do arise when fashion leaves its comfort zone? What life do clothes get when they stop walking down the catwalk? What kind of stories can they draw in the space of existence? What happens to them when the runway spotlights fade out?” So for the film buff or Gucci fan who’s keen on uncovering the veiled answers to these cryptic questions, stay tuned for the daily releases of its episodes on various platforms from now till 22 November.