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For Spring, Longchamp Traverses the Big Apple

By Bianca Husodo

 
Longchamp Spring/Summer ’20 Show

For her third season in New York, creative director Sophie Delafontaine opted for one of the city’s most spectacular spots. Under the cloud-speckled blue skies, at the Hearst Plaza’s outdoor courtyard, of which Henry Moore’s ‘Reclining Figure’ sculpture floats in the Paul Milstein Pool, she sent 40-strong looks out to play.

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Longchamp Spring/Summer ’20 Show

Kaia Gerber opened the show in a black nylon mini dress, paired with Delafontaine described as “knitted boxing shoes” — a sneaker-stocking hybrid that went up to the mid-calves.

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Longchamp Spring/Summer ’20 Show

Looks 5, 8 and 10.

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Longchamp Spring/Summer ’20 Show

The miniaturised Le Pliage totes.

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Longchamp Spring/Summer ’20 Show

Looks 12, 13 and 16.

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Longchamp Spring/Summer ’20 Show

Looks 22, 25 and 26.

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Longchamp Spring/Summer ’20 Show

Look 39.

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Longchamp Spring/Summer ’20 Show

Looks 30, 33 and 38.

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Ever since creative director Sophie Delafontaine decamped Longchamp from its Parisian headquarters to New York for its runway presentations, the Longchamp girl has gradually acquired a gritty urban polish to herself. For Spring/Summer ’20 — her third season in the Big Apple — Delafontaine opted for one of the city’s most spectacular spots. Under the cloud-speckled blue skies, at the Hearst Plaza’s outdoor courtyard, of which Henry Moore’s ‘Reclining Figure’ sculpture floats in the Paul Milstein Pool, she sent 40-strong looks out to play.

Kaia Gerber, opening the show, stomped in a pair of sneaker-stocking hybrid that went up to the mid-calves. Her black nylon mini dress flurrying about her. A few looks later, hemlines dropped lower in the form of diaphanous skirts and dresses. Both frills and leather soon came along. But the memo was clear: It was all about sophisticated convenience. Despite the teetering between feminine sensuality and masculine toughness, not one single stiletto heel stepped on the concrete runway. 

Show notes revealed that the mishmash of timelines was, too, weaved into the clothes. Details, sourced from the ’70s and the ’90s, were meshed together in crop tops and translucent skirts; grunge-reminiscent leather jackets enveloping knitted two-piece sets. The flirty bohemian meets the nonchalant sports enthusiast. All these battling elements were tied together in a dawn-to-dusk colour palette, an output that Delafontaine was strongly inspired by American artist and feminist Judy Chicago’s fluorescent desert explosions. 

The bags were a proposal of their own. Fittingly so, with Longchamp, being a house of accessories first and foremost. The label’s twenty-something Roseau carryall metamorphosised into bucket bags and micro top-handle sling bags. Mini bags came in waves. Though it was the midget Le Pliage that stole the limelight. Queried what she pictured women carrying in the minuscule tote, Delafontaine answered to Vogue: “A credit card, because you are always an independent woman; and your lipstick, because you are very feminine. What else do you need?”