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The Best of Milan Fashion Week, in Pictures

By Laura Rysman

Salvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.
 
Kevin Tachman
Salvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.

The Fall 2019 shows have wrapped up in Milan. See our favourite moments, as captured by T’s photographers.

Shown inside a sprawling former ice-skating rink, Missoni’s Fall 2019 collection featured many of the house’s signatures: Lurex and patterned knits tugged into ’70s-influenced “long, lean and liquid” shapes. There were easygoing, ombré suits and relaxed robe coats for men (and no shortage of tinsel); for women, sparkling jumpsuits and long coats were styled with layers of knit accessories — wide belts, floor-grazing dickeys, glittery pierrot collars, gauze-thin arm warmers and rolled-edge caps.

Ambra VernuccioMissoni Fall 2019.
Missoni Fall 2019.
Ambra VernuccioMissoni Fall 2019.
Missoni Fall 2019.
Ambra VernuccioMissoni Fall 2019.
Missoni Fall 2019.
Ambra VernuccioMissoni Fall 2019.
Missoni Fall 2019.

Just two days after Salvatore Ferragamo announced the appointment of its women’s wear designer, Paul Andrew, to the post of creative director for the entire brand, Andrew and the brand’s men’s wear designer, Guillaume Meilland, presented a brilliantly hued fall collection inside Milan’s lovely if haunting Rotonda della Besana, an 18th-century former cemetery complex. Understated and opulent as usual, the collection started off with gray suiting before moving into rich jewel tones. There was, of course, plenty of what Ferragamo does best: luxury leather in all possible forms, from suede trousers to a supple poncho cape.

Kevin TachmanSalvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.
Salvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.
Kevin TachmanSalvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.
Salvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.
Kevin TachmanSalvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.
Salvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.
Kevin TachmanSalvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.
Salvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.
Kevin TachmanSalvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.
Salvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.
Kevin TachmanSalvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.
Salvatore Ferragamo Fall 2019.

Shalom Harlow and Stephanie Seymour opened and closed Versace’s show, respectively — though the ’90s-infused collection was otherwise more grunge than glamazon. This season, according to Donatella Versace, “imperfection is the new perfection,” and frayed hemlines, T-shirts (emblazoned with the designer’s own face, circa 1995) and reverse layering (think camisoles and bustiers worn over shirt dresses) graced her runway. Fake furs — the brand stopped using real fur last year — looked like excellent flea-market scores. Still, this was Versace, and there was no shortage of bondage straps, safety pins and — in the midst of all the grunge inspirations — flashes of the house’s signature luxury.

Molly SJ LoweVersace Fall 2019.
Versace Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweVersace Fall 2019.
Versace Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweVersace Fall 2019.
Versace Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweVersace Fall 2019.
Versace Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweVersace Fall 2019.
Versace Fall 2019.

Marni turned erotic this season: Women, plus a smattering of men, wore eccentric layers of staid checked wools and racy red leather and silk, with chain necklaces dangling down to the knees above stovepipe boots. Despite the kinky-colour message, the collection was still Marni — and still quirky and cerebral to the extreme.

Ambra VernuccioMarni Fall 2019.
Marni Fall 2019.
Ambra VernuccioMarni Fall 2019.
Marni Fall 2019.
Ambra VernuccioMarni Fall 2019.
Marni Fall 2019.
Ambra VernuccioMarni Fall 2019.
Marni Fall 2019.

Held in a greenhouse on an unseasonably warm winter day, Bottega Veneta’s creative director Daniel Lee made his runway debut, the first show after the brand’s 17-year partnership with Tomas Meier. The house’s high-craft leatherwork, especially of the padded and woven variety, was still at centre-stage, but the collection marked an undeniable step into the future with laser-precise jackets, contemporary knits and Bottega’s signature intrecciato leather reimagined in dramatic, oversized proportions.

Molly SJ LoweBottega Veneta Fall 2019.
Bottega Veneta Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweBottega Veneta Fall 2019.
Bottega Veneta Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweBottega Veneta Fall 2019.
Bottega Veneta Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweBottega Veneta Fall 2019.
Bottega Veneta Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweBottega Veneta Fall 2019.
Bottega Veneta Fall 2019.

As the curtain rose on Moschino’s Fall 2019 show, guests were transported to the alternate reality of a throwback TV game show. The familiar melody of “The Price Is Right” rang out and models were dressed in the sparkling grandeur of late ’70s excess, waving their arms enticingly around washing machines, a La-Z-Boy recliner, a flashy red Ferrari and other glories of full-throttle capitalism. The hair was enormous. The eyeshadow was blue. The disco was high energy. Dresses gleamed with head-to-toe sequins, crystals and even LED lights. Bags — shaped like hair dryers, cash registers, toothpaste tubes and Champagne bottles dangling from shoulder straps — were the emblems of consumerism, and of Jeremy Scott’s loopy, lighthearted world.

Molly SJ LoweMoschino Fall 2019.
Moschino Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweMoschino Fall 2019.
Moschino Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweMoschino Fall 2019.
Moschino Fall 2019.

Along a catwalk lit by the hazy glow of Edison bulbs, Miuccia Prada sent out an ode to romance amid danger this season. The collection was a fusion of extremely feminine touches (delicate laces, sparkly sequin pumps, oversized flower prints and life-size, drooping appliqués of bouquets) with the tropes of tough masculinity (outsized military jackets, metal-encrusted combat boots, thick-soled creepers and a menacing, high-attitude walk). It was a tense coupling, mirrored in the soundtrack that floated freely from fairytale tunes to death metal. Prada, in her own satin military bomber and stilettos backstage, bemoaned the reigning political atmosphere of fear, but offered, with a smile, the hope that “romance wins.”

Molly SJ LowePrada Fall 2019.
Prada Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LowePrada Fall 2019.
Prada Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LowePrada Fall 2019.
Prada Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LowePrada Fall 2019.
Prada Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LowePrada Fall 2019.
Prada Fall 2019.

For the brief spell of a runway show, Karl Lagerfeld was with us again today, two days after his death. The models at Fendi, where the designer served as creative director for 54 years, wore his signature low ponytails and high collars as they paraded by; and in the exquisite nipped-waist dresses, the sharp-shouldered jackets and the dramatic silhouette of a cropped leather jacket over billowing high pants, Lagerfeld’s graceful sketches took shape once more. Afterward, Silvia Fendi bowed alone, beneath the words “Love, Karl.”

Molly SJ LoweFendi Fall 2019.
Fendi Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweFendi Fall 2019.
Fendi Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweFendi Fall 2019.
Fendi Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweFendi Fall 2019.
Fendi Fall 2019.
Molly SJ LoweFendi Fall 2019.
Fendi Fall 2019.

Against a backdrop of flashing LED lights, Alessandro Michele presented his fall 2019 Gucci collection: a carnival of looks mixed with a succession of spiky masks — a metaphor, according to Michele, for the disguises we adopt through clothes. Those disguises mixed arch tailoring, copious fake fur, sparkling lamé, kneepads and a hodgepodge of vintage references (Victoriana, flappers and the space-age ’60s) in a mash-up that continued Michele’s freewheeling, free-associating approach to style.

Valerio MezzanottiGucci Fall 2019.
Gucci Fall 2019.
Valerio MezzanottiGucci Fall 2019.
Gucci Fall 2019.
Valerio MezzanottiGucci Fall 2019.
Gucci Fall 2019.
Valerio MezzanottiGucci Fall 2019.
Gucci Fall 2019.
Valerio MezzanottiGucci Fall 2019.
Gucci Fall 2019.
Valerio MezzanottiGucci Fall 2019.
Gucci Fall 2019.
Valerio MezzanottiGucci Fall 2019.
Gucci Fall 2019.
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