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T Suggests: A Sustainable Cantonese Restaurant, a Photographer’s Tribute to Yohji Yamamoto and Hermès Lipsticks

By T: The New York Times Style Magazine Singapore

At Mott 32 Singapore, diners will bask in a stately oriental ambience created by interior designers at the London- and Hong Kong-based Joyce Wang Studio.
 
Mott 32
At Mott 32 Singapore, diners will bask in a stately oriental ambience created by interior designers at the London- and Hong Kong-based Joyce Wang Studio.

In Singapore, a Decadent Yet Sustainable Chinese-Cantonese Restaurant

The Mott 32 restaurant, its name inspired by and celebrating New York City’s historical first Chinese-owned convenience store on 32 Mott Street, leads in as one of the swankiest joints to hit Singapore in 2020. A welcome addition to the Singapore food scene, the restaurant serves Chinese-Cantonese cuisine with a focus on high-quality, sustainable sourcing of ingredients. Executive chef Chan Wai Keung, known for traditional Cantonese cooking, offers a curation of familiar Mott 32 dishes (the 42-days Applewood Peking Duck is one of the signature dishes at all iterations of the Mott 32 restaurant) and also his spin on Singaporean cuisine, such as the iconic Black Pepper Crab.

The main draw of fine dining is an all-round experience. Apart from high-quality gastronomical offerings, the space is outfitted with the same “netted copper” ceiling seen at its premier establishment in Hong Kong, and volcanic grey terrazzo floors, with a bar front featuring apothecary drawers reminiscent of traditional Chinese herbal stores. In the main dining room, the oriental design is further reinforced as an installation centred in the space — an octagonal canopy that consists of a softly lit ceiling, large paper lanterns, and vertical-rope framing — so guests may dine like nobility under a quasi-pagoda setting. — Terence Poh

Visit Mott 32 at The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands, #B1-42–44, 2 Bayfront Avenue.

A Photographer’s Large-Format Homage to the Yamamoto Look

TakayOne of the shots from Takay’s book of photographs in tribute to Yohji Yamamoto, titled “Fluence: The Continuance of Yamamoto” (2020).
One of the shots from Takay’s book of photographs in tribute to Yohji Yamamoto, titled “Fluence: The Continuance of Yamamoto” (2020).

Yohji Yamamoto hardly needs an introduction. Yamamoto is an era-defining designer who upended Western ideas of dressing alongside Rei Kawakubo’s Comme des Garçons in Paris in the early 1980s. He built a career on proving that the colour black — in all its aggressive, rebellious, sombre, romantic or seductive theatricality — is beautiful. He boldly put men in skirts, much ahead of its time. Perhaps more than most designers, Yamamoto is the poet of black, the godfather of fashion’s risqué film noir.

It’s only apt then that Japanese photographer Takay — who grew up adoring Yamamoto’s work and continued to be influenced by the designer throughout his subsequent career as a photographer (he shot T Singapore’s cover spreads with Kiko Mizuhara and the Opening Ceremony duo, Carol Lim and Humberto Leon) — is now paying homage to the iconoclast. In the mid-’90s, one of his first projects was commissioned by Yamamoto. Later on, he contributed to Victoria & Albert Museum’s norm-shattering “Men in Skirts” exhibition in 2002, which travelled to the Metropolitan Museum the next year. 

This March, Takay is launching a book of 130 portraits, titled “Fluence: The Continuance of Yohji Yamamoto”, dedicating it as a documentation of the Yamamoto look. The photographs are primarily shot in Tokyo, and are all in black-and-white, a mirroring of Yamamoto’s constant predilection for the monochromatic colour palette. His subjects include an artistic confection of Japan’s most familiar names: from stage director Yukio Ninagawa to actress Rie Miyazawa — all dressed in garments borrowed from the four-decade-old Yamamoto archive. — Bianca Husodo

Fluence: The Continuance of Yohji Yamamoto” will be released on 26 March.

A Leather Goods Maker’s Venture Into Beauty

HermèsHermès’s graphic and weighty packaging transforms the lipstick into an objet d’art.
Hermès’s graphic and weighty packaging transforms the lipstick into an objet d’art.

Hermès extends its universe of offerings with the new Rouge Hermès collection of lipsticks and lip products. Unlike other makeup lines, this is a collection of objects devoted to the lips, so you’ll find not just lipsticks, balms and a universal lip pencil, but complementary small leather accessories like a moon-shaped mirror on a cord and a pop-up lipstick case all created in the brand’s “Madame” calfskin.

The colours of the lipstick shades come from Hermès’s own archives — the brand keeps 75,000 colour references on file in its Lyon archives. The first collection of Rouge Hermès comes in 24 shades — ten are matte and 14 are satin — comprising mainly orange, red and pink tones. The casing of each lipstick is an objet d’art in itself. Made of striped black and white lacquer and permabrass metal, these refillable lipsticks are meant to stand the test of time. — Renée Batchelor

Hermès Beauty launches on 4 March at the Hermès boutiques at Marina Bay Sands, Liat Towers and Takashimaya.