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T Suggests: Vintage Mid-Century Danish Furniture, a Father-Son Art Trail and Polo Shirts Made of Recycled Plastic Bottles

By T: The New York Times Style Magazine Singapore

Hidden in Singapore’s Ubi Road industrial area is Noden’s high-ceiling showroom, housing a motley of vintage Scandinavian furniture pieces.
 
Noden
Hidden in Singapore’s Ubi Road industrial area is Noden’s high-ceiling showroom, housing a motley of vintage Scandinavian furniture pieces.

In Singapore, a Vintage Mid-Century Danish Furniture Shop

For almost a century now, Danish design has been continuously synonymous to a sense of well-balanced modernity. It’s typically rooted in no-frills function — a somewhat inherent trope that’s shared among Danish furniture designers. Naturally, their pieces look great together, making them easy to collect as a collective. So there’s little to no surprise that a design hysteria for quality timeless furnishings has renewed itself in the last two decades.

Singapore-based husband-and-wife duo Marko Yeo and Tawan Conchonnet are part of the wide-sweeping new wave of avid collectors. “Our love for Scandinavian design was what set us on our journey of collecting,” says the couple, “but we can’t keep it all.”

In 2013, Yeo and Conchonnet launched Noden. Noticing a gap in the Singapore market, where most Scandinavian furnishings available were mostly replicas, their shop specifically specialises in vintage mid-century Danish furnishings. The duo owns and runs the operation, making annual trips to Denmark themselves to source for the shop’s eclectic range. Plenty of their rare finds include original pieces of design masters such as chairs by the likes of Hans Wegner and Finn Juhl or wooden desks by Arne Vodder. As a majority of them were made in the post-World War II period, the duo often has to restore each piece through an arduous, old-fashioned process.

Relocating Noden to a natural light-filled showroom in Ubi Road last year, Yeo and Conchonnet suggest buyers to pay a visit to the store and see the pieces “in the flesh” before investing in them. The duo advises, “It will help you decide the choice pieces you may wish to have for your home, especially if your home is not ready yet.” — Bianca Husodo

Visit Noden at 39 Ubi Road 1, #04-03.

An Italian Father-Son Art Exhibition Scattered in Three Secluded Locations

Padre e FiglioFrom left: A new version of Michelangelo Pistoletto’s large installation, Metamorfosi (1976–2013), of which consists of a tall pile of rags and used clothes divided in two by a double mirror — a seemingly metaphorical re-appropriation of the landscapes of his late artist father’s place of birth, Gravere; Palazzo Gromo Losa in Biella, one of the three locations of the exhibition.
From left: A new version of Michelangelo Pistoletto’s large installation, Metamorfosi (1976–2013), of which consists of a tall pile of rags and used clothes divided in two by a double mirror — a seemingly metaphorical re-appropriation of the landscapes of his late artist father’s place of birth, Gravere; Palazzo Gromo Losa in Biella, one of the three locations of the exhibition.

Newly opened exhibition “Padre e Figlio” — a direct Italian translation of “Father and Son” — pays homage to the father-son relationship of the Pistoletto family. Here, the works of feted Italian artist-art theorist Michelangelo Pistoletto and his late artist father Ettore Pistoletto Olivero, are juxtaposed together for the first time as a parallel to the dialogue of their father-son relationship.

Opened on 17 April, the artworks of the Pistolettos are dispersed in three venues in the Italian countryside district of Biella: Palazzo Gromo Losa, a noble 14th-century palatial complex (pictured above); Cittadellarte — Fondazione Pistoletto, a former textile mill refurbished into an “art and creativity laboratory” by Michelangelo himself; and Casa Zegna, the Zegna family’s 1930s home which has been recasted as an “archive-museum” concept of Ermenegildo Zegna’s.

Inside, over a hundred works of the Pistolettos — paintings, mirror pictures, installations, light boxes, videos and photographs — are thoughtfully contrasted to highlight their father-son relationship in an unusual manner: “leaving fathers a legacy instead of giving sons all the responsibility for communicating their parents’ knowledge and passions,” as explained in a statement by Casa Zegna.

Alberto Fiz, curator of the exhibition, says, “Looking at the dialogue between Michelangelo Pistoletto and his father it’s possible to explore the concepts of historical time and subjective time, but also the need to accept differences, from which even intimate complicity may result.” — Bianca Husodo

The “Padre e Figlio” exhibition runs till13 October at three locations in Biella. More information here.

A Polo Shirt Collection Threaded With Recycled Plastic Bottles

Polo Ralph Lauren
 

Amid Ralph Lauren’s repertoire of sensible offerings, the polo player has long been an embodiment of the classic American style and ambition. Timeless as they are, the polo player is also often a celebrated icon that symbolises progress, particularly in the realms of romance and familial togetherness. And in this spirit of progress and timelessness, the fashion house has started to pursue and introduce sustainability into its creative muse.

Reimagining its iconic Polo shirts with Mother Nature in mind, the American fashion house has unveiled the “The Earth Polo” collection in partnership with UK commercial recycling company, First Mile. With threads crafted out of plastic bottles and an inventive carbon dyeing approach that uses zero water, the collection is fast heralding the house’s devotion to tackling global plastic and water wastage.

“Ralph Lauren will commit to removing at least 170 million bottles from landfills and oceans, and will convert the use of all virgin poly-fibre to recycled poly-fibre by 2025,” says Ralph Lauren’s Chief Innovation Officer, David Lauren.

Transforming discarded plastic bottles to iconic classics, “The Earth Polo” collection tells the tale of environmental conservation. Conceived in four colourways — navy blue, baby blue, green and white — each shirt from the collection is recyclable and is made of approximately 12 plastic bottles.

“Plastic waste is a major issue threatening the environment — we want to be part of the solution and utilise an innovative approach to create something valuable,” Lauren adds. — Sng Ler Jun

The Earth Polo collection is available in stores and online.